Running Out Of Time, Halleck Orders Grant to Take Fort Henry

January 30, 1862 (Thursday) Things were moving swiftly for Henry Halleck, Union commander in Missouri. His plan to fall upon Fort Henry along the Tennessee River had been echoed by General Grant, who wanted to strike immediately. Halleck wanted to hold off until he had 60,000 men and a commander who wasn’t Ulysses S. Grant.Read More

Grant Concludes that Fort Henry Must Be Taken

January 28, 1862 (Tuesday) “With permission, I will take Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and establish and hold a large camp there.” -Brigadier-General U.S. Grant General Grant, commander of what would soon be called the Union Army of the Tennessee, had formulated a plan to take Fort Henry, along the Tennessee River. He, along withRead More

The Union to Eastern Tennessee? Richmond Stirs at Stonewall’s Conduct

January 26, 1862 (Sunday) With the Union victory at Mill Springs, General Don Carlos Buell, commander of the Department of the Ohio, was handed two opportunities. The Rebels, under General George Crittenden, had been scattered, leaving the door to Eastern Tennessee wide open but slightly defended. It also freed up General Thomas, Union commander atRead More

Beauregard Says Go (West)! More Mutiny in Jackson’s Command

January 25, 1862 (Saturday) Despite the warnings from his friends, General Pierre Gustav Toutant Beauregard had accepted President Davis’ invitation to leave his command under General Joe Johnston near Manassas, and take up a new command under General Albert Sidney Johnston in Tennessee. The previous day, Roger Pryor, acting as liaison between the President andRead More

Rebel Plot to Overturn Stonewall’s Command; Buell’s Opportunity; Lincoln’s Guns

January 23, 1862 (Thursday) To most of the South, Stonewall Jackson had completed his mission. And on paper, perhaps he did. He had marched his army from Winchester, tormented the Yankees at Hancock, Maryland and then took Romney without a fight. But left out of that seemingly simple operation were the privations and sufferings ofRead More

Jackson Wants to Attack Bath, Loring Refuses; More Disagreeing in Missouri

January 3, 1862 (Friday) After a brief few days of warm, even balmy, winter weather, it was gone, replaced by bitterly chilling wind, snow and a thermometer that plunged into the single digits as Stonewall Jackson’s 11,000 men shivered their way from Winchester to Romney. They stepped off at 6am on the first day ofRead More

Jackson’s Saucer is Full of Secrets; Lincoln Must Command

December 31, 1861 (New Year’s Eve – Tuesday) This had certainly been a strange year for Thomas J. Jackson. At its start, he was a professor at the Virginia Military Institute, under the immediate command of William Gilham. The United States flag flew over the parade grounds and they all still held true to theRead More